Tag Archives: content

Updates!

It’s been a more sparse week than usual, so I wanted to apologize for that, but I have news and some upcoming things happening!

In an attempt for variety and exposure, a couple new items will be added to the posts. I’ve been wondering how to do this for a little while and I think I know what I want to do now. One of the regular posts will be a follower/followed spotlight, for those blogs that are writing based, and some that aren’t. Which, another reason for this, is to vary up what I put on this blog, and to give more than just advice and prompts.

I want to be a font of knowledge, but I got worried that I was being too narrow and limiting myself by only writing posts of what I encounter and not taking from the already wide world of information that’s before me. That comes in the form of other, more successful bloggers (in many senses), and their own experiences, so I would start doing some reblogging as well, which I have always been very apprehensive about. It feels sort of like a cop out, but it is genuinely about expanding the blog.

So, actually reblogging things, and giving a showcase of blogs that I follow or of those that follow me! Also likely that I’ll start posting on Fridays again. Pending how busy the week is for me.

I am enjoying not having to write 1700+ words every day, though, and being able to take a short break from heavy duty writing feels good. I did manage to hit 50k on the 26th, but kept writing, albeit slowly and not as much, until the 30th. Like I said in an earlier post, I rewarded my struggle and efforts on the last day with a massive chocolate cupcake that was way too decadent and rich but so delicious.

I will probably never have one of those again because holy crap that’s unhealthy, but I was glad to indulge. Pictures were taken to document its enormity, even! I’ll put those up soon because cupcake. As soon as I learn how to resize them…

As always, if you have questions, comments or suggestions, they’re all welcome! Thank you for your patience with me this week!

-The Novice Wordsmith

Editor’s Block

Other than the writing of the story, the editing process is my favorite. As time goes on and you spend more time with the novel or the short story, or whatever it is, you learn what exactly you want to do with it, and you have a better idea of what fixes to make.

I admit that it lets loose the perfectionist in me. I get a second and third and fourth glance at the content and have an ability to make any tweaks or even re-write as I see fit. As someone who is very picky about what she writes, I manage to have a very difficult time through NaNoWriMo, when the biggest principle is simply to “keep writing, don’t revise until the month is over.”

Though, in some cases, revising and editing can be a worse task. John Green said once that he had re-written 52,000 of Looking for Alaska’s original wordcount when he got to the first round of editing.

That, to me, however, is incredibly intimidating, but I can see where it comes from. You have a better idea for the story and its direction, and accordingly, you need to re-write and take things out where it’s appropriate to accommodate.

Others, however, hate the task of editing. Friend finds it rather a daunting process, to go through all of the 60-100,000 words. While I relish in the chance to be able to mark up  my work and get it in the form and pristine shape that I want it, he’d rather leave it as is. There’s so much to read through, to try and fix other than the obvious typos.

If you hate editing and revising, there’s still hope, you can do it! I have faith in you! You can do the thing! <pom poms>

First, take it a little bit at a time. Measure it chapter by chapter instead. If you’re having trouble remembering what exactly happened in the novel, there’s no shame in going back to re-read it and getting it fresh in your head, to return and do the best work on it that you can.

Second, focus on typing mistakes first.

As you go on, you’ll likely see things you do or don’t like, things you’ll want to improve or leave or expand upon. This is where the third step comes in, but it should come naturally. Your writing instincts should be able to tell you what you want to keep and what may need to be re-written.

The more time you spend on it, the more you’ll do. It’s a natural progression, start small and work your way up. It doesn’t deserve to intimidate you, it’s your work, you own it.

Another option is to send it to a friend you trust, who also writes (preferably), and get a second opinion. Take it into consideration, and try to see what you think is the best course of action.

If you’re going the professional route of being published, you’ll likely have an editor who thoroughly checks and rechecks your work for errors and gives you their opinion. A writer back in the 50s (forgot the name), who I was studying for a Fiction Writing class back in college, had an editor that would take out huge swaths of his story and re-write them, or simply take them out. Looking at a revised copy of his original work was like watching the short story go through the chop-shop.

Then again, that editor was credited for the man’s great success as an author.

Personally, that’s a little terrifying. To encounter someone who changes that much of your work and to have to put your trust in them for getting anywhere with the story. Whew.

I love editing, like I said. If you don’t, I know you can make it through; think of it as selective writing! You’ll get to the end quicker than you realize, if you stick with it.

-The Novice Wordsmith