Tag Archives: sluggish

The Fires of Passion: Part 2

The first part of this post, was meant as a reply to the Charlie Hebdo attack, but also as a segue into the topic of letting your heart help you write. To say that what you believe in, or what makes your heart race, the ideas that make your eyes light up and keep you awake at night, can be one of the best vehicles for your writing.

The opposite of this is hating what you’re writing and dragging your feet through it. “It wrote itself” versus, “I am so glad this is over.”

There’s the unmistakable joy of a frenzy of writing because you love it and because you want to, because something about the topic speaks to you. Fiction, non-fiction, journalism, memoirs, biographies, whatever it is, there’s pieces that capture you and don’t let go.

“It writes itself” when you’re on fire, when you can see the scene in front of you clearly and you’re in love with the view. From where you’re sitting, you should be able to blast through whatever comes up, and by the time you’re done, probably you’ll be stunned at the volume you accomplished in the amount of time you did it.

Even if the story doesn’t lay itself all out to you at once, isn’t to say you have no passion, either. With excitement comes a varying degree of push and desire, controlled by a few factors including how important the piece is, how strong the different scenes are playing in your head, and what you feel about the scene or scenes themselves. Why not add in if it’s a big project, with it’s intimidation, mild or not, and if you know you’re looking to publish, the worry you get from making sure everything is perfect.

My personal view on the other side of this, the sluggishness, has always been to change something. Figure out what’s got you stuck and move things around. Find a way to dig yourself out of the rut. In those cases that you can’t, which I experienced first hand in November, you just have to hunker down and find a way through.

With gusto behind your words, all things are possible. Your stories can take you where you want to go if you let them, if you get out every bit of care and painstaking effort that you can muster. Zest peppering each paragraph and verse puts more weight and meaning into the words that are taken down and consumed in reading.

Because if you don’t like what you’re writing, who’s to say the reader will?

-The Novice Wordsmith

**PS for those interested in half of what inspired this post, you can read the quote by Ray Bradbury here, which is part of an essay he wrote about the same thing.

Sick Day

I have been trying to write this post for the past few hours and nothing is coming up right.

Writing is the most affected by my sickness when I do get hit with it, which sucks, but at least my big tell for being sick is that I get huge apathy for any kind of productivity, which is convenient. I like convenient, but I hate feeling like this. It took me most of the day to get in the shower yesterday and finally get dressed in, you know, clothes that aren’t pajamas. My normal routine gets knocked off its feet for something that favors rest, and I can’t manage to get a word in edgewise that actually sounds decent.

Sometimes, at least, I’ll manage enough that sounds like it could pass and I move on to the next thing, but everything I have to do in a single day takes double the effort when I’m under the weather.

That’s what this post was going to be about, more general than about my personal experience, because I feel like you get more out of it if it’s left a little more ambiguous. Everyone has their own quirks when they get sick, their tells. Mine is apathy. Someone else’s could be simpler, sluggishness, that’s associated with the disease’s symptoms.

Just because I can’t manage the effort of writing something eloquent when I’m sick doesn’t mean that it couldn’t be the opposite for someone else, too! In which case, I’m envious.

Sick days are lumped in there with days where your head can’t settle down, when you can’t get creativity jump started, or when things are frustrating, you’re stuck, writer’s block won’t let go… The list is seemingly endless, and I keep finding more days to stick in there. Thankfully, though, they happen rarely enough, but when they do, it’s a nuisance and a half.

Or several nuisances. I can never keep up with the conversion rates.

With a bottle of nyquil in one hand and luden’s cough drops in the other, I can only hope that this passes swiftly, and I can finally get back into a good writing curve. Stay careful this season!

-The Novice Wordsmith